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Sneakers Style

Nike Goes Back to the Future with Self-Lacing Adapt BB

No other brand in sportswear has successfully informed the present by looking to its past quite like Nike. They’ve accomplished this, for the most part, by capitalizing on what our country holds in the highest esteem: popular culture. There’s no better example than the brand’s scene-stealing moment in 1989’s Back to the Future II when Michael J. Fox’s character, Marty McFly, unveils Nike’s unicorn of sneaker culture, the Nike Mag.

In the decades that followed, Nike worked to actualize the shoe that was simply a one-of-one concept for the ’80s film: a technological marvel of a sneaker that featured self-lacing capabilities far before such a thing was even fathomable.

The Assignment
Universal/Nike

It wasn’t until 2005 that Nike designer Tinker Hatfield called budding Swoosh engineer Tiffany Beers into his office. Hatfield tasked Beers with producing the world’s first functional Mag sneaker. This leap to action was heightened by a petition with more than 30,000 signatures calling for Nike to create a power-lacing Mag by 2015, the year Michael J. Fox traveled to in the sequel of the celebrated film trilogy, and the Nike team intended to make that happen.

Beers was working against the clock. She had ten years to do what most in her field couldn’t accomplish if given a lifetime. She started with a replica Nike Mag without power-lacing capabilities in 2011, a teaser sneaker that sold at a charity auction for varied yet weighty sums, with all the proceeds going to the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research.

The Official Release
Nike

Beers’s brilliance finally got out of Nike’s Beaverton, Oregon, campus on October 4, 2016, when the Nike Mag with power-lacing functionality was officially released. The shoe was available for purchase through a lottery system and subsequent auction, with proceeds benefiting the aforementioned Parkinson’s foundation. Some pairs sold for upwards of $200,000. This Nike Mag iteration raised $6.75 million for Parkinson’s research. Presently, the Mag sells for upwards of $30,000 on secondary retail sites like StockX.

Today’s Self-Lacing Sneakers
Nike

Today, the Nike Mag represents the limitless potential in sneaker design and is an unattainable treasure for which we have all pined since the days of Back to the Future II. Nike has made significant strides to normalize self-lacing sneakers for the masses. They’ve since released the $720 HyperAdapt auto-lacing running shoe and, most recently, the $350 Nike Adapt BB performance basketball sneaker.

The latter returns next week in a new iteration that pays tribute to the Nike Mag. Colored in similar shades with a likeness to the Mag that’s undeniable, a lightweight Flyknit upper houses the self-lacing AdaptFit component that allows the futuristic sneaker to automatically hug the foot once you’ve slipped it on.

Nike
Nike

Although the retail price of $350 for a pair of sneakers is no minor sum, they are certainly a valuable piece of sneaker history worthy of coveting. The Nike Adapt BB “Mag”—officially named the Adapt BB “Wolf Grey”—effectively translates the allure of the Mag into something tangible for today’s sneaker consumer. This Adapt BB features LED lights that glow in a similar fashion as the Mag, punctuating the retro theme with (very literal) glowing nostalgia.

Look for the Nike Adapt BB “Wolf Grey” on May 29 for $350 on Nike SNKRS at 10 a.m. EST.

Related: These ’90s-Era Sneakers Are Officially Cool Again

Related: 50 Iconic Sneakers Under $150 That Are Still Dope

Related: 12 Shoes Rappers Love

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Sneakers Style

Why the Nike Blazer Might Be Your Summer 2019 Staple

The Nike Blazer is a basketball shoe created in 1972 and named after the Trail Blazers, the NBA franchise based in Portland, Oregon. The sneaker made waves for its on-court benefits but has since been adopted by the streetwear crowd. Its clean lines and classic colorways make it a surefire pick for your summer lineup. Relaunched as one of the debut styles in Virgil Abloh’s buzz-worthy “The Ten” collection with Nike, the Blazer is re-energizing the Swoosh’s sportswear offerings.

These sneakers have picked up steam and continue to flood Instagram feeds. With summer just around the corner, it wouldn’t be a surprise if Nike brings more Blazer collaborations and colorways. Here are our favorite moments in the life of the Nike Blazer and why you might want to incorporate it into your summer wardrobe.

Off-White x Nike Blazer
Nike

Abloh’s first iteration of the Off-White x Nike Blazer Mid first hit in September 2017, disrupting the vintage basketball sneaker’s OG flavor with an inside-out silhouette. Complete with oversized swoosh logos and parenthetical lettering, these shoes not only caused the demand for Blazers to erupt but also altered the approach to footwear design as a whole.

Suddenly, the Blazer exploded beyond the sneaker collector realm and into the outfit rotations of street-style enthusiasts, athletes and celebrities. Its versatile shape makes it simple to pair with summer clothes, like track pants, oversized hoodies and graphic tees. Because of its contemporary yet timeless design, there isn’t really a wrong way to style it.

Nike Blazer Collaborations
Nike

Shortly after the Off-White renditions hit mass resale markets, John Elliott started including Nike Blazer Mid Rebels (a contemporary Blazer variation) into runway shows and launched a few limited-edition styles.

Next, Slam Jam’s Class of ’77 makeup was released, intentionally flipping the swoosh on the inside panel upside down to create a different look from the standard white-and-black offering of the Nike Blazer Mid ’77. Slam Jam’s collaborative Blazer is currently fetching resale prices that fluctuate between $450 and $874 on StockX.

Though the classic styling of the Blazer from the Nike Sportswear division is back in near-OG form, it’s Nike SB that’s been consistent in including the basketball-turned-skate icon into its product range since 2005. The skate division’s assorted offerings include iconic releases, like the Supreme x Nike SB Blazer, the Michael Lau x Nike SB Blazer “Beijing Olympics” and the Nike SB Blazer “Milk Crate.”

SB team rider Lance Mountain, who collaborated on the Nike SB x Air Jordan 1 from 2014, has skated in Blazers throughout his professional career. A dedicated member of the Stüssy tribe, Mountain designed several of his own color variations, and a partnership organically formed between Nike SB X Lance Mountain Collection at the tail end of 2018. Mountain designed both low- and mid-top styles.

While skate style is having a moment in both fashion and footwear, Nike has continued to harness the energy of the SB division. Most recently, its Orange Label series highlighted classic styles from throughout the years. Releasing in both black and white collections at select skate shops, like Premier, the SB Blazer emerged in a skate-friendly aesthetic with a nostalgic gum midsole.

Japanese streetwear savant Sacai recently previewed its yet-to-release iteration of the Blazer in two eye-catching color combos.

Blazer Mid ‘77 Vintage
Nike

After many collaborations, Nike sensed that it had raised enough hype to let its Blazer Mid ’77 Vintage loose in January 2019.

Originally debuting in primarily white colorways, these variations featured a mostly white leather upper that is teamed with off-white hues on the toe’s suede paneling, while a sail-hued midsole compliments the nylon tongue’s retro appeal. The exposed foam on the tongue also resonates with a design cue that both luxury and lifestyle labels alike have capitalized on: the DIY trend.

The first several variations of the nostalgic style were juxtaposed with Lucid Green, Pacific Blue and Habanero Red branding with a classic black contrast, making it beyond simple to incorporate into footwear rotations. And for those who missed out on the Off-Whitecollaborations or refuse to pay north of $1,000 on the resale market, it’s an easy way to still get the personalized vintage aesthetic.


You can buy the Nike Blazer on Nike.com or Bloomingdale’s.

Related: These ’90s-Era Sneakers Are Officially Cool Again

Related: 50 Iconic Sneakers Under $150 That Are Still Dope

Related: 12 Shoes Rappers Love

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Sneakers Style

Our Top 5 Travis Scott Nike Sneaker Collabs

Travis Scott has quickly risen through the ranks of high-profile sneaker collaborators. His partnership with Nike and Jordan Brand is largely considered the most exciting and influential in sneaker culture right now. And yes, that includes Kanye West, Pharrell Williams and even Virgil Abloh collaborations (now that the feverish run of Off White’s “The Ten” is in our rearview).

While towering in its ability to generate hype and move SKUs, Scott’s partnership is still very young. He has only a handful of collaborative releases to date, some of which were only for friends and family, owned by few and never released for purchase. This exclusivity (and scarcity) speaks to just how much energy is behind Scott. Everything he touches quickly becomes grail-worthy. “The shoes stand up on their own. Even if you’re not a fan of his music, it’s an Air Jordan with authentic storytelling not pulled from an obscure photoshoot from 1991 during Michael Jordan’s heyday,” affirmed Complex’s Matthew Welty.

Scott is at the height of his powers both musically and creatively, and the anticipation surrounding his upcoming Air Jordan 1 release on May 11 has now reached a fever pitch. Arguably the most anticipated sneaker release this year, Scott’s Air Jordan 1 has been sought after by sneakerheads for months. Here, we detail La Flame’s top five Nike (and Jordan Brand) collaborations.

Travis Scott x Air Jordan 33
Nike

Release date: February 14, 2019

Known as Michael Jordan’s latest post-retirement signature sneaker, the Air Jordan 33 was outfitted in a Cactus Jack treatment on Valentine’s Day 2019 during NBA All-Star Weekend. It was Scott’s debut creation in the performance basketball space. Given the success of the shoe, there’s a strong likelihood it won’t be his last foray into hoops-specific styles for Jordan Brand.

Travis Scott x Jordan Trunner LX
Nike

Release date: Friends and family (unreleased)

Scott’s first Jordan Brand design back in 2017 was a friends and family iteration of the Jordan Trunner LX. A cross-training silhouette first released in the early 2000s, the sneaker was largely thought to be an intriguing (even odd) first choice for Scott. Yet with many collaborative sneakers, brand partners like Scott are often tasked with heightening releases, similar to a hit single released before a new album. The Jordan Trunner, which had just been re-released at the time, needed a bit of energy. This shoe from Scott, which was never actually released at retailers, managed to generate the right amount of buzz for the low-top slip-on.

Travis Scott x Nike Air Force 1 Low ‘White’
Nike

Release date: December 5, 2017

The Travis Scott x Air Force 1 Low NRG (or energy), Scott’s first official Nike release, much like the unreleased Jordan Trunner LX, came in the midst of a retro campaign. Fueled by companion AF1 collabs spurring both newness and nostalgia, Scott’s pair featured detachable swooshes that worked with the DIY trend in sneaker culture at the time. Scott, to add even more hype to the release, began wearing pairs of the shoe that he’d tie-dyed—a menswear trend that’s been all the rage over the past few seasons.

Travis Scott x Air Jordan 4 ‘Cactus Jack’
Nike

Release date: June 9, 2018

If Scott’s Air Force 1 Low was his Birds in the Trap Sing McKnight (the breakout album that placed the Houston native among the best artists in hip-hop), then his Air Jordan 4 “Cactus Jack” was the sneaker equivalent of his 2018 Astroworld album—a massive commercial success that launched Scott into ever rarer air. Inspired by the now-defunct Houston Oilers NFL franchise and his Cactus Jack record label, the release marks Scott’s debut Jordan Brand release, which was celebrated with a carnival in his hometown (just outside the Toyota Center where Scott acts as an ambassador for the Houston Rockets). The shoe was considered by many to be the best sneaker of 2018. Scott also produced several friends and family pairs of this Air Jordan 4, in purple, dark gray and olive.

Travis Scott x Air Jordan 1 ‘Cactus Jack’
Nike

Release date: May 11, 2019

This Saturday, May 11, Scott and Jordan Brand will release their most coveted sneaker to date. The Air Jordan 1 with an inverted swoosh, stash pocket and muddy brown suede (inspired by his childhood backyard) first dropped as a surprise release during Scott’s Grammy performance earlier this year. Another quick-strike release followed on Scott’s birthday when the shoe landed on Nike SNKRS and Scott’s website for purchase. The shoe’s global release finally takes shape this weekend, accompanied by a Scott-designed apparel collection.


For more information on how to purchase the Air Jordan 1 “Cactus Jack” through a number of raffles at select global retailers, visit here.

Related: 12 Shoes Rappers Love

Related: A Definitive Ranking of Virgil Abloh’s Off-White Nike Collabs

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Sneakers Style

9 Rocking Music Sneakers You Wish You Would’ve Copped

Led Zeppelin has always been my favorite band. From the first time I heard them on my dad’s XM car radio to my first live Zeppelin concert (well, it was a tribute band that my mom shelled out $50 a ticket for on a school night), it has felt like a Conway x Zeppelin collaboration ever since. When I saw the band’s logo and cover art canvasing a pair of Vans, it was a truly special moment.

Sneaker collaborations often happen when music and lifestyle trends intersect creatively. In celebration of this culture, I want to share some of my favorite artist-inspired kicks: 

Nike SB Dunk High x Wu-Tang Clan 1999, 2015
Flight Club

Catch these on: A millionaire sneakerhead or an actual member of Wu-Tang Clan.

Why I love them: This sneaker is so exclusive that even Method Man needs them to retro so he can get a pair.

 

Wu-Tang Clan ain’t nothin’ to fuck with and neither was their collab with Nike SB. During the genesis of the popularity of the Nike SB Dunk, the rap group linked up with the swoosh for one of the most coveted colorways to grace the silhouette. With a black-and-yellow theme similar to that of the Iowa colorway, the can’t-miss Wu-Tang “W” on the heel is a serious differentiator to some regular Dunk Highs. It was a release limited to just 36 pairs.

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https://www.flightclub.com/dunk-high-le-black-bright-goldenrod-030453
Nike Air Force 1 Roc-A-Fella Records 2004, 2017
StockX

Best for: That old-head you know who thinks Alife makes the best streetwear.

Why I love them: This sneaker is New York incarnate. A “White/White” Air Force 1 with an homage to the “Roc” is *chef’s kiss.*

The Roc-A-Fella Air Force 1 is as classic as classic gets. A simple white-on-white design with a small Roc-A-Fella logo hit on the heel, the sneaker was a certified grail straight out of the gate. Debuting as a promotional item in 1999, this colorway is said to have set the blueprint for future sneaker collabs.

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https://stockx.com/nike-air-force-1-low-rocafella
Bape x Kanye West, 2007
Flight Club

You’ll get these when: When you secure that bag and make a lavish purchase on Flight Club.

Why I love them: Brings me back to the album that brought me (and several others) into the Kanye fandom. Also, it represents a simpler time when Ye was the king of pop culture.

Back when Kanye was still the man, he released what has come to be considered one of the most coveted sneaker collabs of all time. In participation with Bape designer Nigo, the Kanye West “Dropout Bear” Bapesta was born. The iconic and lovable mascot from his College Dropout album graces the heel cup of the sneaker, seeming to peer over the brown and cream leathers that host the jagged star. The silhouette mirrors that of Nike’s Air Force 1, but the jagged star and impossible-to-miss bear mascot truly separate this sneaker from the pack.

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https://stockx.com/a-bathing-ape-bapesta-college-dropout
Vans x Supreme x Public Enemy, 2016
StockX

Made for: People who camped out at Supreme and possibly Flavor Flav.

Why I love them: The bold yellow/green/red color scheme on the logo, laces and upper makes this a super-attractive sneaker. Not to mention, they’re the perfect synergy between the three brands.

2016 saw a monster of a sneaker collaboration: legendary rap group Public Enemy and streetwear giant Supreme with Vans. The anti-establishment tone of Public Enemy’s music gels perfectly with the grunge of both Supreme and Vans. The colorful collaboration features hits of green, red and yellow with branding on the ankle and midsole. A loud colorway from a group with a loud message makes for an ideal sneaker. 

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https://stockx.com/vans-sk8-hi-supreme-public-enemy-black-yellow
Reebok x Kendrick Lamar, 2016
StockX

Best for: K. Dot fans!

Why I love them: Kendrick using his platform to de-escalate neighborhood violence through a cool medium like sneakers? Amazing. 

 

Similar to the late, great Nipsey Hussle, superstar rapper Kendrick Lamar has been using his platform to advocate for peace in his hometown of Compton, California. In numerous collaborations with Reebok, Lamar’s crossing colors of red and blue has been seen on multiple silhouettes, including the Ventilator, Club C and Classic Leather. We particularly love the Classic Leather Deconstructed, which has a nice leather upper with red and blue hits on the tongue and Reebok branding.

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https://stockx.com/reebok-classic-leather-kendrick-lamar-deconstructed
Vans x Led Zeppelin, 2019
Nordstrom

My ratingFive out of five! ?????

Why I love them: Did you read the intro? Thanks, Mom and Dad!

 

Vans collaborated with Led Zeppelin this year for the band’s 50th anniversary. Featuring an allover print of the four members’ individual symbols on the Era model (not shown) and the same emblems on the ankle of the Vans Sk8-Hi silhouette (pictured above), the collab includes the band’s most iconic imagery.

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Vans x David Bowie, 2019
StockX

Who would wear: An edgy theater kid who auditioned at NYU but didn’t get in.

Why I love them: Bowie’s passing in 2016 was tragic, and his contribution to music had such a prominent impact on my life and music taste. I hope this collaboration shines as brightly as he did.

 

Vans keeps the rock train rolling in 2019 with a six-sneaker collaboration paying homage to late rock star David Bowie. Featuring iconic Bowie themes, like lightning-bolt graphics, and a bold color palette, the collab includes many different aesthetics from his legendary career. We like the Slip-On 47 V because it features Vans’ staple checkerboard pattern with some yellow Bowie flair, complete with aVelcro strap across the forefoot. The more slept-on silhouette makes a strong statement in this collection.

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https://stockx.com/vans-slip-on-47-v-dx-david-bowie-hunky-dory
Dr. Martens x The Sex Pistols, 2019
StockX

These are good for: Anyone who prefers fish and chips as a go-to meal and hates big government.

Why I love them: The Sex Pistols are awesome. Whether or not you like their look or their music, this is a perfect collab that most could get behind.

 

When you google “synergy,” the first thing that should come up is this collab. From attitude and aesthetic to being on-brand, this mash-up checks all the boxes. Entrenched in rebellion and youth culture, the large graphic print of Sid Vicious on the Dr. Martens 1460 high-top boot is just about as punk rock as it gets. Whether you’re stomping around the stage like Sid or crushing the daily commute in style, the Sex Pistols x Dr. Martens are a go-to.

Related: 50 Iconic Sneakers Under $150 That Are Still Dope

Related: These ’90s-Era Sneakers Are Officially Cool Again

Related: 9 Dope Sneakers Killing the White Sneaker Trend for Spring

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https://stockx.com/dr-martens-1460-sex-pistols
Vans x A Tribe Called Quest, 2018
StockX

Catch these on: See the Roc-A-Fella x Nike Air Force 1 entry above.

Why I love them: Great execution by brand and band.

 

First things first: RIP to Phife Dawg. Similar to the David Bowie collection, Vans partnered with rap group A Tribe Called Quest for a multi-sneaker collab. Playing with the group’s cover art, allover prints and other stylistic elements, these sneakers are a must-have for any true ATCQ fan. I particularly like the Authentic silhouette, which features a black-and-white pattern and a track list written on the upper.

Related: These ’90s-Era Sneakers Are Officially Cool Again

Related: 50 Iconic Sneakers Under $150 That Are Still Dope

Related: 12 Shoes Rappers Love

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https://www.vans.com/article_detail/a-tribe-called-quest.html
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Sneakers Style

Nike’s React Presto Merges Golden-Era Sneaker Design With Modern-Day Innovation

Originally released in 2000, and marketed by Nike as a “T-shirt for your feet” due to its extreme comfort, the revolutionary Air Presto marked a paradigm shift in the way that sneakers fit and, subsequently, how they were sized. Tobie Hatfield (brother of Nike design legend Tinker Hatfield) first conceptualized the V-Notch concept in 1996—the sneaker mold at Nike’s in-house Innovative Kitchen that would become the Nike Air Presto.

This concept was the mold Hatfield and his team created in pursuit of what would ultimately become the Air Presto. Nike was looking to produce sneakers that offered unparalleled comfort, divergent from the limitations that a leather and mesh combination often held. With the help of Kevin Hoffer and lead designer Bob Mervar, Hatfield helped give birth to the Nike Air Presto at the turn of the century.

Nike
https://news.nike.com/news/nike-react-presto
Nike
ews.nike.com/news/nike-react-presto
Nike
https://news.nike.com/news/nike-react-presto

Almost 20 years later, Nike continues to champion its importance in footwear innovation with the unveiling of its Presto React. Reliant on the genius of the original design—yet not restricted by the technical boundaries of its time—this melding of sneaker eras gives a timeless Air Presto silhouette while adding modern Nike React technology: A cushioned foam implanted in the midsole for extreme energy return and stability.

Sneaker design often looks in the rearview to inform the road ahead. The art form is both an essential, nostalgic ode to the past and a vehicle to make sure the present is steeped in historic richness. The Nike React Presto, much like the original Air Presto, features a traditional lacing system; The design, with its seamless bootie construction, effectively poses as a slip-on, but you can lace them up, too.

With fluid neoprene fabrication, the form-fitting upper of the Air Presto wasn’t sized like most sneakers. Given its likeness to a T-shirt, the shoe was sold in XS to XL sizes. The React Presto offers a similar fit by inheriting much of the same construction and by returning the midfoot cage and heel crash pad. Commonality can also be found in the employee-sourced character nicknames that accompany each style.

Nike
https://news.nike.com/news/nike-react-presto

Nike
https://news.nike.com/news/nike-react-presto
Nike
https://news.nike.com/news/nike-react-presto

Back in 2000, Nike rolled out a graphic ad campaign highlighting designs by Monica Taylor and copy conjured by Dylan Lee, backed by Nike’s longtime creative partner Wieden and Kennedy. They released 13 original colorways of the Air Presto all at once.

To honor that history, Nike is reviving those nostalgic, character-based color schemes starting with the “Brutal Honey” and “Rabid Panda” on May 9. In addition, Nike by You variations of the Presto React will revisit other favorites that include the “Shady Milkman,” “Unholy Cumulus” and “Roger Kielbasa” iterations also available on May 9. Modern contemporary colorways of the Nike React Presto will release on May 16 bearing names like “Psychedelic Lava,” “Chatty Matador,” “Breezy Thursday” and “Witness Protection.” They will retail for $120. 

Each new sneaker represents the beckoning of a new era for the Presto. But not without a glance back at the nostalgia of years past. It’s proof that Nike took the right path all those years ago.

Related: These ’90s-Era Sneakers Are Officially Cool Again

Related: 50 Iconic Sneakers Under $150 That Are Still Dope

Related: 12 Shoes Rappers Love

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Style What To Buy

The Fear of God x Nike Collection Just Dropped, Here’s What You Need to Know

Compounding effortless cool with a seamless understanding of contemporary fashion, Jerry Lorenzo, a 42-year-old Los Angeles–based designer whose pieces have been worn by Kanye West, Justin Bieber, Rihanna, Travis Scott and many others, masters the narrative of how Fear of God, his fashion line, is worn. April 27 (when the second installment of his Fear of God x Nike collection lands in stores) marks one of the most anticipated streetwear and sneaker releases of 2019.

Much of the aesthetic of Fear of God, aka FOG, leans heavily into Lorenzo’s personal taste and his exceptional eye for styling, layering and proportion.Truly, and almost singularly, FOG’s global ascension can be attributed to Lorenzo’s personal styling of the brand on himself. No one wears it better or more aspirationally than he does. This is not so much a call to mimic his personal aesthetic but to create your own.

There are very few modern brands whose founder both shapes and defines the feel of the company better than any muse could. Does anyone wear Fear of God better than Lorenzo? Or has anyone ever looked better in a Tom Ford suit than Tom Ford? In fact, in a recent New York Times interview, Ford confessed that he allows cinematographers to see his films only after they’re complete. The multi-hyphenate, whose critically acclaimed pictures A Single Man (2009) and Nocturnal Animals (2016) have culturally resonated far outside the epicenter of fashion stalwarts, largely works in this manner, color-correcting each film frame as a guide for the cinematographer to follow. While this method may strike most as arrogant or rather controlling, in the mind of an artist like Ford or Lorenzo, it’s an essential approach to almost any project.

Lorenzo isn’t known to be as controlling as Ford, but he is an artist, and as one, much of his work comes with a certain level of supervision; a certain way of seeing and accepting before anyone else can muster a summation. This, for both fashion powerhouses, has come with a great measure of success.

All of Lorenzo’s work is visually arresting, including the “Old Town Road”esque pictorial campaign promoting the highly anticipated Fear of God x Nike collection that lands this weekend. Here are five things you need to know before it arrives:

5. Fear of God’s Nike Collaboration Is Also an NBA Partnership
Nike
https://news.nike.com/news/nike-fear-of-god-raid-official-images-and-release-date

Now that Nike is again the official apparel outfitter of the NBA, and this upcoming collection revolves around Lorenzo’s adoration of the sport, it made sense that Nike would utilize its licensing rights to apply the NBA logo throughout this range of products. You’ll see NBA-branded jerseys and warm-ups that effectively place Lorenzo and Fear of God on a very short list of streetwear companies to partner with the globally beloved league.

4. Lorenzo Redesigned the Nike Air Raid After Falling in Love with the Shoe in High School

When Lorenzo first laid eyes on the Tinker Hatfield–designed Nike Air Raid in 1992, he was only a sophomore in high school. He immediately adored the off-court cross-strapping sneaker, which, at the time, had been introduced with a unifying “Urban Jungle Gym” ad campaign featuring Spike Lee and Tim Hardaway.

“When the kid walked in the classroom with the Air Raid, no one told me that I was supposed to like the Air Raid. I was just drawn to it, the design, the colors. It was like, oh my God, what is that?” Lorenzo said. “It became interconnected with all these other real emotional things that were happening at the time of the shoe.”

Lorenzo felt an even deeper connection to the Air Raid when he discovered that it was Hatfield’s first off-court sneaker—unconventional at the time—designed for the playground. He found it fitting that it would be his first off-court design for Nike as well.

3. Lorenzo Created an Entirely New Silhouette for the Collection
Nike
https://news.nike.com/news/nike-fear-of-god-raid-official-images-and-release-date

Although the Air Raid–inspired Nike Air Fear of God Raid leads this widely touted collection, Lorenzo also flexed his design prowess by creating a new silhouette from scratch. Driven by the look and feel of a traditional moccasin, Lorenzo’s Air Fear of God Moc has a full ripstop nylon upper with an adjustable mid-foot strap. A toggle system at the heel allows the wearer to tighten the shoe from an untraditional position. The look adds to the collection of off-court sneakers Lorenzo is designing for Nike.

2. FOG x Nike Visual Campaign Circles “Small Town Dreams” Story Line

Shot on a picturesque country road with minimal props aside from a glorious old gas station and an eerily perfect diner, the campaign missive follows a basketball superstar who is pre-stardom. Humble beginnings arrive at this on-trend western background that looks like a scene from a vintage Marlboro ad. Its cast rides in a near immaculate beige Ford pickup with nothing more than a weathered basketball and really, really nice clothes. Draped in tailored sportswear-inspired tops, breakaway warm-up pants, parkas, elongated tees and netted shorts, what surrounds these garments, in essence, is emptiness—a symbolic ode to starting with nothing only to gain everything.

1. You Can Purchase the Fear of God x Nike Collection on April 27 at Select Retailers
Nike
https://news.nike.com/news/nike-fear-of-god-raid-official-images-and-release-date

Even though it won’t be easy to get your hands on this collection, select Nike retailers will stock this Saturday’s release. For sneakers, the first place you’ll want to try your luck is Nike SNKRS. U.K. retailer END. will host a raffle for both the Air Fear of God Raid and Air Fear of God Moc. SoleboxSlam Jam and Union will also host raffles for an opportunity to purchase. Apparel will be available at FearOfGod.com and Nike.com.

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Style What To Buy

Here Are 5 Colorways Jordan Should Re-Release as Retros

On Monday, April 15, Jordan broke the internet all over again. The highly anticipated Air Jordan IV Retro OG Bred IVs subtly dropped on the Nike SNKRS app and sold out in minutes. It’s already been dubbed the “must-have sneaker” for the spring/summer season, and many sneakerheads believed they missed out on an ultimate come up. However, a wide release is slated for May 4.

But as we save our coins and circle the date on our calendars for one of this year’s most anticipated releases, ONE37pm has decided to dig through our vintage Jordan shoeboxes. We created a list of some of the coolest overlooked colorways that should be retroed for the new generation of sneaker collectors to enjoy.

Air Jordan X (Ice Blues: White / Obsidian – Ice Blue – Varsity Red)

Released on June 11, 2005, this eye-catching colorway is an ultimate sneaker collectible for many Jordan fans due to its rarity. Ice blue and obsidian are perfectly meshed to symbolize Jordan’s collegiate colors in UNC Tar Heel blue and the school’s archrival, the Duke University Blue Devils. But what stands out on these classic shoes besides the colorway is the sole, which is inscribed with MJ’s greatest career accomplishments.

Air Jordan II (Retro Black / Chrome)

The Air Jordan II sneaker has a pretty interesting history in the Jordan sneaker lineage. Designed by Bruce Kilgore, the original pair debuted in the high-top white/red colorway in 1986 and then in a low-top style in 1987. It was later retroed in 1994 when it was rumored that the original molding of the shoe was either destroyed or stolen. So in 2004, Nike decided to cut up parts of the ’94 retro release and mod it onto the rare black/chrome release. They haven’t seen the shelf since. It’s time for that to end.

Air Jordan Retro XV (Black / Varsity Red)

Inspired by the number of years MJ played after retiring for the second time (15), Jordan collaborated with legendary designer Tinker Hatfield to design a shoe that commemorated the greatness he exhibited on the court. Jordan and Hatfield decided on a design that paid homage to the X-15 fighter jet, which broke the speed record on October 3, 1967.

Air Jordan VII (Olympic White / Midnight Navy / True Red)

The 1992 USA basketball team known as “The Dream Team” was put together to win gold at the Summer Olympics in Barcelona, Spain, and was arguably the greatest sports team ever assembled. Michael Jordan was, of course, on that team.

What’s so unique about this shoe is that Jordan and Hatfield decided to put MJ’s “Dream Team” number (9) on the heel, rather than the signature number he wore throughout his career (23).

Jordan and the Dream Team crushed the international competition, beating teams by an average of 43.4 points per game.

Air Jordan I (OG: UNC White / Carolina Blue)

This shoe started it all.

In 1984, after receiving major scrutiny from the NBA and getting fined for using colors the NBA felt violated its “league uniform policy,” Nike wanted to pay homage to a rookie who stuck with them through the controversy. Nike paid every single fine Jordan was hit with for every game he played in the original black/red colorway and hired a team of designers, including Hatfield, Kilgore and Peter Moore, to create a colorway that perfectly represented his alma mater and his legacy as one of the school’s all-time great scorers. The UNC White / Carolina Blue colorway became a staple in the hip-hop culture as well as one of the most underrated releases to ever come out of the Jordan lineage.

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